Phoenix Office
         845 North 6th Avenue
         Phoenix, AZ 85003
         Tel 602.344.0034
         Fax 602.344.0043
         Email JWillmott


Areas of Practice

  • Death Penalty Cases
  • Homicides
  • Aggravated Assults
  • Sexual Assults
  • Kidnappings
  • Armed Robberies
  • Robberies
  • Burglaries
  • Thefts
  • Drug Sales
  • Drug Possessions
  • Forgeries
  • Traffic Crimes

    Death Penalty Cases:

    The death penalty is the most severe punishment prosecutors may seek to impose for 1st Degree Murder charges. Since humans are fallible, the risk of executing the innocent can never be eliminated.

    Homicides:

    A.R.S. § 13-1101 et. seq. There are several different ways that the government charges homicides, including 1st Degree Murder, 2nd Degree Murder, Manslaughter and Negligent Homicide. Each category carries different punishments.

    Aggravated Assults:

    A.R.S. § 13-1201 et. seq. Depending on the circumstances of your case, an assault charge can be either a misdemeanor or a felony. Many people do not know that a misdemeanor assault can become a felony assault based on just a few small things such as the use of a weapon, injuries sustained by the victim, or the victim’s age. The difference between being convicted of a misdemeanor or a felony can be extremely important for the future.

    Sexual Offenses:

    A.R.S. § 13-1401 et. seq. Sexual assault charges are very serious felony crimes that have extremely harsh penalties. There are a number of different ways prosecutors can file these types of charges.

    Kidnappings:

    A.R. S. § 13-1301 et. seq. A person commits the offense of kidnapping by knowingly restraining another person with the intent to commit certain acts.

    Robberies:

    A.R.S. § 13-1901 et. seq. A person commits robbery if in the course of taking any property of another from his person or immediate presence and against his will, such person threathens or uses force against any person with intent either to coerce surrender of property or to prevent resistance to such person taking or retaining property.

    Burglaries:

    A.R.S. § 13-1501 et. seq. A person commits the crime of burglary by entering or remaining unlawfully in certain places with the intent to commit any theft or any felony therein. The type of place that the person enters or unlawfully remains will decide the level of felony.

    Thefts:

    A.R.S. § 13-1801 et. seq. There are detailed laws on the crime of theft, which include a number of different acts. The basic requirement of each of these crimes is that a person without lawful authority knowingly controls property of another. Theft can be a felony or a misdemeanor depending on the value of the stolen property and the specific act committed.

    Drug Crimes:

    A.R.S. § 13- 3401 et. seq. Depending on the nature of the case, drug crimes can range from a misdemeanor possession of marijuana to a felony possession of drugs for sale. Methamphetamine sales are punished more severely than sales of narcotic drugs.

    Forgeries:

    A.R.S. § 13-2001 et. seq. A person commits forgery generally if the person has an intent to defraud another and falsely creates a written instrument or knowingly possesses a forged instrument, or offers a forged instrument.

    Traffic Crimes:

    The difference between criminal traffic law violations and civil traffic law violations is in the punishment. Punishment for civil traffic law violations is limited to a fine. A defendant who commits a civil traffic law violation will not face jail time. Punishment for criminal traffic law violations, on the other hand, comes with a potential jail sentence.

  • Areas of Practice
  • Death Penalty Cases
  • Homicides
  • Aggravated Assults
  • Sexual Assults
  • Kidnappings
  • Armed Robberies
  • Robberies
  • Burglaries
  • Thefts
  • Drug Sales
  • Drug Possessions
  • Forgeries
  • Traffic Crimes
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    The information you obtain at this site is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation. We invite you to contact us and welcome your calls, letters and electronic mail. Contacting us does not create an attorney-client relationship.